Clinical Services

Seizure Consultations in Dulles & Leesburg, VA

What Happens During a Seizure?

Seizures affect people in different ways. Not all people notice their symptoms, but all seizures have a beginning (aura stage), middle (ictus stage) and an end (postictal stage). While all seizures are unpredictable, knowing what occurs in each stage could help prepare you when you’re about to have a seizure.

Beginning (Aura Stage)

An aura is the warning sign of a seizure. The symptoms associated with an aura vary depending on the type of seizure, but the most common symptoms include:

  • Deja Vu
  • Visual loss or blurring
  • Abnormal feelings or sensations
  • Distorted feelings, panic or fear
  • Nausea
  • Physical abnormalities, such as dizziness, headache or lightheadedness
  • Perceived smells, sounds, and tastes

Middle (Ictus Stage)

The ictus stage, or the seizure itself, includes the first symptoms to the symptoms at the end of the seizure. This is closely related to the seizure activity in the brain.

  • Loss of awareness
  • Confused feeling
  • Daydreaming
  • Unusual tastes and smells
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Feeling of impending doom
  • Difficulty talking
  • Lack of movement or muscle tone
  • Repeated blinking in the eyes
  • Repeated, non-purposeful movements
  • Change in skin color
  • Biting the tongue
  • Dilated pupils
  • and more.

End (Postictal Stage)

During the end, or recovery stage, of the seizure, the body begins to relax and the after effects set in. The symptoms of the postictal stage vary depending on the person, but the most common include:

  • Confusion
  • Inability to respond to others
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness
  • Loss of bladder control or urge to use the bathroom
  • Thirst
  • Memory loss
  • Exhaustion

Learn more about seizures.

Seizure and Epilepsy Treatment in Leesburg, VA

Dr. Seth Tuwiner is a board certified neurologist in Lansdowne, VA. He has a subspeciality in Neuromuscular disease, epilepsy, and clinical neurophysiology. Need more information on seizures? Contact the Virginia Center for Neuroscience or call today at 703-293-5244